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Old 03-29-2012, 05:14 AM   #1
lsbrath
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Cool Running Mac on Windows or Get Windows Laptop

Hello,

Should I go with a running Windows on my powerbook or just get a windows laptop? I am leaning towards just getting a windows laptop. Considering that I am doing nextgen analysis and teaching a course in it where students have macs and PCs.

Any feedback would be appreciated.

Mgavi
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Old 03-29-2012, 05:19 AM   #2
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Hmm that is a can of worms ...

If you can live with slightly reduced battery life in windows (I do not think the windows drivers supplied for the Mac hardware are as efficient) then you could do bootcamp and have best of both worlds. If you have enough RAM then you could also go the fusion/vmware VM route.

You do not say if you are actually using the laptop for doing analysis or just using it to access a server/cluster.
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Old 03-29-2012, 08:39 AM   #3
lsbrath
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Cool Virtual machine or PC

Hi GenoMax,

I am using my macbook pro for analysis. As it is mapping reads takes awhile with 4gb of ram.
Lsbrath
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Old 03-29-2012, 08:49 AM   #4
GenoMax
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Perhaps the better option would be to invest money in more memory for the Macbook. Upgrade to 8GB should be in the $30-40 range (tons of deals around) or if your Macbook pro can go up to 16GB then you could consider that possibility.

With more RAM you can definitely run windows in a VM when needed.

PS: If you are intending to set the Macbook aside purely for analysis and use an inexpensive windows laptop for routine tasks ......


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Hi GenoMax,

I am using my macbook pro for analysis. As it is mapping reads takes awhile with 4gb of ram.
Lsbrath
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Old 03-29-2012, 10:35 AM   #5
lsbrath
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The problem is that my students with PCs have been having some trouble. Not just in this class but also in the Perl BioPerl course. I figured that it would be easy just to have a inexpensive PC laptop to check and grade their code.

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Old 03-29-2012, 10:55 AM   #6
Richard Finney
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I don't know that much about it , but macbooks can boot "windblows" ...

http://www.ehow.com/how_6788299_dual-boot-macbook.html

I'd personally require Linux; which is also do-able, and you can triple boot to keep your OSX and Windows ... (via google "macbook triple boot")...
http://wiki.onmac.net/index.php/Trip...t_via_BootCamp

Last edited by Richard Finney; 03-29-2012 at 11:00 AM.
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Old 03-29-2012, 11:00 AM   #7
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I use VirtualBox running Windows 7 on a Mac daily. Works great, as long as you aren't doing anything particularly CPU intensive (and definitely not graphics intensive).
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Old 03-29-2012, 01:58 PM   #8
lsbrath
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Thanks ECO! NGS analysis can be CPU Intensive.
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Old 03-29-2012, 01:59 PM   #9
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Have them get AWS accounts.
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Old 03-30-2012, 02:43 AM   #10
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Try Linux ^^
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Be realistic. Demand the Impossible.
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Old 03-30-2012, 03:05 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lsbrath View Post
The problem is that my students with PCs have been having some trouble. Not just in this class but also in the Perl BioPerl course. I figured that it would be easy just to have a inexpensive PC laptop to check and grade their code.

Or you could just give them all A's and spend your time doing something more interesting.
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:29 AM   #12
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I use cygwin on windows often. Perl isn't for kids IMO, better teach them C or C++. They can pick up Perl by themselves with a man page and a wiki.
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:42 AM   #13
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Not all of them will.

Everyone's brain is wired differently. Some "get" the logic/language right away (and those would fall in the category you describe below) where as for others it is an uphill slog, no matter what.

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Perl isn't for kids IMO, better teach them C or C++. They can pick up Perl by themselves with a man page and a wiki.
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Old 04-02-2012, 09:06 AM   #14
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Not all of them will.

Everyone's brain is wired differently. Some "get" the logic/language right away (and those would fall in the category you describe below) where as for others it is an uphill slog, no matter what.
If they know how to program in C then they get the logic, therefore they can do it. The problem with teaching Perl is that it is heavily dependent on external libraries, so as the thread starter has noted getting people to use Perl or Bioperl on any given platform is difficult, likewise Perl means different things to different people and teaching that is also difficult. In general Perl is not a well defined language, therefore not really suitable for academic training. Though it may be suitable for trade schools or on the job training type courses.
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Old 04-02-2012, 09:24 AM   #15
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My comment was targeted about programming in general (should have made it clearer). It was not directed at a specific language.

I am with you on the observation below.

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If they know how to program in C then they get the logic, therefore they can do it. The problem with teaching Perl is that it is heavily dependent on external libraries, so as the thread starter has noted getting people to use Perl or Bioperl on any given platform is difficult, likewise Perl means different things to different people and teaching that is also difficult. In general Perl is not a well defined language, therefore not really suitable for academic training. Though it may be suitable for trade schools or on the job training type courses.
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Old 04-02-2012, 09:28 AM   #16
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If you like BIOinformatics then Perl.
If you like bioINFORMATICS then C++.

It's a personal choice and obviously both have their place. Pointless argument.
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Old 04-02-2012, 10:34 AM   #17
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Quote:
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If you like BIOinformatics then Perl.
If you like bioINFORMATICS then C++.

It's a personal choice and obviously both have their place. Pointless argument.
However, BIOinformatics(as opposed to bioINFORMATICS) isn't an academic pursuit. More like a trade school endeavor. See reasons listed above.
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:59 PM   #18
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However, BIOinformatics(as opposed to bioINFORMATICS) isn't an academic pursuit. More like a trade school endeavor. See reasons listed above.
Someone better tell the NIH and Cell press. Because anyone using quick and dirty perl scripts to solve complex biological problems is not an academic. I never realized that I would have been better off getting my training at a trade school rather then UCSC, Cold Spring Harbor and MIT. Cool, I learn new stuff every day.

Note: I'm only responding here because it's kind of funny. The argument is itself is obviously pointless. We can talk about the advantages of C++ and Perl for bioinformatics, which could be informative to some.
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Old 04-03-2012, 07:03 AM   #19
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Someone better tell the NIH and Cell press. Because anyone using quick and dirty perl scripts to solve complex biological problems is not an academic. I never realized that I would have been better off getting my training at a trade school rather then UCSC, Cold Spring Harbor and MIT. Cool, I learn new stuff every day.

Note: I'm only responding here because it's kind of funny. The argument is itself is obviously pointless. We can talk about the advantages of C++ and Perl for bioinformatics, which could be informative to some.

And you have no point because all the good programs are written in C++, and your perl programs just call them. Academically speaking, quick and dirty perl programs usually aren't publishable. If you look at the programs that get published and actually cited.... C++(BLAST/Abyss/Velvet/Hmmer/ClustalW are all in C++)

As a utilitarian there is something beautiful about a script that uses these libraries, but really its nothing to write home about much less a paper about the source code. A trade skill like Cisco certification or something not an academic discipline.
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Old 04-03-2012, 07:08 AM   #20
rskr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ETHANol View Post
Someone better tell the NIH and Cell press. Because anyone using quick and dirty perl scripts to solve complex biological problems is not an academic. I never realized that I would have been better off getting my training at a trade school rather then UCSC, Cold Spring Harbor and MIT. Cool, I learn new stuff every day.

Note: I'm only responding here because it's kind of funny. The argument is itself is obviously pointless. We can talk about the advantages of C++ and Perl for bioinformatics, which could be informative to some.
Another way to think about it is Perl is the software equivalent of duct tape. Sure you can rig up all kinds of Novel devices by taping them together or fix broken stuff with it, but not something that gets taught in your mechanical engineering course. You learn that on the job.
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