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Old 10-18-2008, 05:18 AM   #1
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Default PubMed: DDBJ dealing with mass data produced by the second generation sequencer.

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Related Articles DDBJ dealing with mass data produced by the second generation sequencer.

Nucleic Acids Res. 2008 Oct 16;

Authors: Sugawara H, Ikeo K, Fukuchi S, Gojobori T, Tateno Y

DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) (http://www.ddbj.nig.ac.jp) collected and released 2 368 110 entries or 1 415 106 598 bases in the period from July 2007 to June 2008. The releases in this period include genome scale data of Bombyx mori, Oryzas latipes, Drosophila and Lotus japonicus. In addition, from this year we collected and released trace archive data in collaboration with National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The first release contains those of O. latipes and bacterial meta genomes in human gut. To cope with the current progress of sequencing technology, we also accepted and released more than 100 million of short reads of parasitic protozoa and their hosts that were produced by using a Solexa sequencer.

PMID: 18927114 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]



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Old 10-21-2008, 07:43 AM   #2
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In this article, our Japanese colleagues have provided us their thoughtful analysis of some technological consequences:
"One's genome is not only one's property but also one's ancestors' and descendants'. We are products of evolution. We will not be able to freely publicize the contents of our genomes. The genome of a person hides many recessive inferior genes that are shared with his parents and children.....It is thus necessary to pay great care and attention in handling or dealing with person's genome contents".
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