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Old 10-14-2014, 08:41 AM   #1
RoshMan
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Default Reading Mutations

Hello,

I apologize if this is in the wrong area of the forum.

I am working with a lot of mutation data and was confused on how to read the specific mutation. I have put in 9 mutations that I have. Could someone explain how to read this information (Like was do the ">" and "/" actually mean)? Also how do i determine the length of the mutation?

Some data:
A>A/AAAAG
A>A/AAAC
A>A/AAG
A>A/C
T>T/G
T>C/C
AAAAG>A/A
AAAT>AAAT/A
AACACACAC>AACACACAC/A


Sincere Thanks in Advance

Last edited by RoshMan; 10-14-2014 at 08:42 AM. Reason: Additional Question
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Old 10-14-2014, 09:09 AM   #2
Brian Bushnell
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I assume it is of the form:
"reference" > "allele 1"/"allele 2"

The length of the mutation (which is somewhat subjective) is thus maximum of the length of the reference or one of the alleles.
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Old 10-14-2014, 09:21 AM   #3
RoshMan
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What do ">" and "/" mean?
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Old 10-14-2014, 09:24 AM   #4
Brian Bushnell
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Nothing, they are separators. But ">" implies that an arrow (the thing on the left changed to the thing on the right) and "/" is used to separate alternate alleles.
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Old 10-14-2014, 09:40 AM   #5
RoshMan
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Ok, I think I understand

Thank You
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