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Old 01-10-2017, 11:15 PM   #22
SNPsaurus
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Mick Watson tweeted:
‏@BioMickWatson
NovaSeq flowcells have up to 4 lanes but only one loading port :-)

I haven't seen this confirmed, but it is going to be a little tough for facilities that aren't sequencing dozens of large genomes at a time to load single projects that require 3 billion reads. Will a lab wanting to sequence 10 exomes have any use for the Novaseq? Either they team up with other labs and deal with one of them doing something dumb that makes the whole run fail, or they use a S1 chip (will that be as cheap per nuc as S2/3/4?) or continue to use HS2500/4000s.
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Old 01-11-2017, 06:01 AM   #23
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Dr. Keith Robinson talks about NovaSeq in this entry.

As long as Illumina does not discontinue HiSeq 2500, small cores can breath a sigh of relief.
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Old 01-11-2017, 08:36 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kmcarr View Post
Having 4 channels doesn't mean they are separate lanes in the same sense as the HiSeq. The NextSeq 500/550 flow cells look just like that with 4 channels yet there is but a single input port so the same sample gets distributed to all 4. These flow cells also look very much like NextSeq flow cells; huge size, surrounded by a plastic frame. The similarity to NextSeq/MiniSeq lends credence to the notion that the NovaSeq supports only 2 color chemistry.

UPDATE: I just got an official, in person confirmation from two Illumina FAS's, the NovaSeq is TWO color chemistry.
Thanks for the info and updates, kmcarr. I haven't had a chance to see a NextSeq in action so I didn't realize all the channels loaded from a single input.
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Old 01-11-2017, 08:55 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Genohub View Post
Biggest change is NovaSeq's reduction in space between nanowells, designed to increase cluster density and data output (up to 2-3x more per flow cell than HiSeq X). Notable is the omission of Nextera based exome and Nextera DNA library prep in the initial compatibility line up.

Summarized specs here: https://blog.genohub.com/2017/01/10/...5000-and-6000/
The only information on reagent costs I've seen were referenced on the Omics Omics blog post:

Quote:
The BioIT World piece quotes deSouza saying that NovaSeq would be 20% less expensive per gigabase than HiSeq X, 45% cost savings vs. HiSeq 4000 and 50% vs. HiSeq 2500.
Which seems non-nonsensical to me. HiSeq X and HiSeq 3000/4000 flowcells/chemistry seemed very similar, if not identical, and reagent costs for the HiSeq X chemistry was only a little lower (maybe 20%) than HiSeq 3000/4000 costs.

I didn't do a full cost analysis on the HiSeq 3000/4000 reagent cost per gigabase, but it looked like it was about 1/2 that of a HiSeq 2000.

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Old 01-11-2017, 09:13 AM   #26
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Okay, here is the actual quote from BioIT:

Quote:
deSouza ran quickly through the comparisons. For a HiSeq 2500 customer, NovaSeq delivers 50% price reduction per Gb; 100% more output per run on the S2 flow cell. For HiSeq 4000 customers, NovaSeq delivers 45% price reduction and 2.5x the output based on the S3 flow cell. For X customers, “NovaSeq will be 20% more economical while delivering three times the throughput.”
So the cost comparison to the HiSeq 2500 is to a NovaSeq S2 flowcell. Whereas the HiSeq 4000 comparison is to a NovaSeq S3 flowcell.

So, if your core can generate enough libraries (dual indexed, I would presume) to make an S3 flowcell run worthwhile, you would generate sequence at 1/4th to 1/3rd the reagent costs of a HiSeq 2500. Even considering the logistical complexities that would entail, it seems like it would be difficult to brush off that kind of a price difference.

I just wish the S1 price per gigabase was going to come in close to that of the S2. But I'm doubting it will.

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Old 01-12-2017, 08:16 AM   #27
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I spoke to our Illumina sales rep on the phone yesterday. I was told $30/Gb for S2 100 cycle kits and $15/Gb for 300 cycle. Was also told that 2500 and 3000 are being discontinued effective end of either Q1 or Q2, forgotten which. Our rep hasn't had full briefing yet so I'd be cautious in relying on that, but it's what I've heard so far. Should be getting something in writing this week.
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Old 01-12-2017, 09:25 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by massspecgeek View Post
I spoke to our Illumina sales rep...Was also told that 2500 and 3000 are being discontinued effective end of either Q1 or Q2, forgotten which. Our rep hasn't had full briefing yet so I'd be cautious in relying on that, but it's what I've heard so far. Should be getting something in writing this week.
Ouch... hope that just means selling new ones, rather than maintaining and supplying existing ones.
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Old 01-12-2017, 09:28 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by Brian Bushnell View Post
Ouch... hope that just means selling new ones, rather than maintaining and supplying existing ones.
Sorry, should have said that support will continue. Only sales of new instruments affected.
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Old 01-12-2017, 09:29 AM   #30
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Sequencing reagents for GAIIx still appear to be available so those who want to keep using their 2500's should be fine.
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Old 01-12-2017, 09:33 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by massspecgeek View Post
Sorry, should have said that support will continue. Only sales of new instruments affected.
Taking out HiSeq 2500 would leave a gap in the continuum for "Illumina"verse between NextSeq 550 and HiSeq 4K/NovaSeq 5000.

Perhaps we will see a new sequencer (or two) slot in between there, in future.

Last edited by GenoMax; 01-12-2017 at 09:40 AM.
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Old 01-14-2017, 06:46 AM   #32
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Reagent cost is $6375 per flowcell for Hi Seq X. If the price of the new reagent is 80% of Hi Seq X, then it is $5100 per flowcell for NovaSeq 6000.

This means that the new reagent cost is $1.7/Gbp which is a huge drop from the previous $7/Gbp. Correct?
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Old 01-15-2017, 07:42 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllSeq View Post
I'm pretty sure they meant 80% of the running cost (per Gb), not 80% of the specific kit cost. However, we've still only seen hints at specific pricing, so we can't say for sure.
Thanks for your reply.

Then from the cost perspective, it is not that impressive.

Big jump is throughput is always welcomed by the big genome centers. However, if base accuracy is down due to the new chemistry, then that won't even be a plus.

Anyway, I think we need to wait a little bit more to assess this new toy.
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Old 01-17-2017, 12:38 PM   #35
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Yeah, if you already have a HiSeq X then the only major advantage is that there are no library type limitations on the NovaSeq.
What NovaSeq does is offer the average core a shot at a price per base previously only available to those with the throughput to need 5+ HiSeq X.
That said, you would need to run S4 reagents to get that price per base and:
(1) S4 won't be ready until late 2017
(2) It will generate 3 Tb of data in a single run == a single lane (logically, if not physically).

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Old 01-24-2017, 10:24 AM   #36
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Added some information from webinar to the original post.
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