SEQanswers

Go Back   SEQanswers > General



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help in understanding when does Biotinylation occur - Enrichment step in Ion Torrent Bluesee Ion Torrent 0 05-28-2016 08:01 AM
Difference Between Cross Homology and Cross Dimer In A PCR Primer AnushaC Bioinformatics 3 05-16-2016 10:27 PM
cross-over microsatellite bacteria loba17 General 0 05-25-2012 06:16 AM

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-27-2019, 02:26 PM   #1
jaunzaum
Junior Member
 
Location: Brazil

Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 1
Default Why is more likely to exactly one cross over to occur?

Hello. I'm studying genetic linkage and the recombination frequency calculation (that is assumed to be directly proportional to allele distance) considers that only one cross over will take place. I know this is an estimation, but I want to know what the biological mechanism is that justify the probability that EXACTLY ONE crossover will take place.
In other words, what is the probability of no cross overs taking place, or a double cross over, or a triple cross over, and why are these probabilities lower than for a single crossover? And also, it is considered that all regions in the chromosome have the same chance to suffer a cross over, is this correct? If not, what are the most probable and the least probable sites and why?
jaunzaum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2019, 05:18 PM   #2
luc
Senior Member
 
Location: US

Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 385
Default

In many organisms, one cross-over per chromosome seems to be highly advantageous for proper segregation in meiosis. The tension building up when the chromosomes are pulled apart at the kinetochors/centromeres, while still being held together at crossovers, seems to be very beneficial for the proper orientation of the chromosomes and the timing of the processes.
In many organisms, the crossovers are skewed towards the distal, close to telomere, regions -- especially in males.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4012503/
luc is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off




All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:52 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO