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Old 08-18-2011, 03:30 AM   #1
schmima
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Default LaTeX and PLoS ONE

Hm - the questions are not really fitting in this forum - but I guess that some of you may have the experience to help (and waiting for the answer from the editors takes time...).

I'd like to submit a manuscript to PLoS ONE using their TEX template. Some things I'm not really sure about:

1. How to include Supporting information (captions) in the .tex file. It seems
that there was no predefined section for this. Is it possible to add another
section "Supporting Information" and include one subsection per supporting
file? For example:

Usage in the text body:
...(Supporting Information S1)... - without using the \ref{} command as this
interferes with the figure/table numbering of the main figures.

Information at the end of the manuscript:
\section{Supporting Information}
\subsection{S1}
Description/caption of the file holding the Supporting Information


2. Are websites written directly into the text or cited via the references (in this case, how to include in the .bib file?)?


3. Is it necessary to include hyphenation characters (\-) for long "words" which are not automatically split (websites, DNA primer sequences...)?


All the best,

Marc
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Old 08-18-2011, 04:33 AM   #2
raonyguimaraes
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1) I would suggest you to use Lyx for the beggining - http://www.lyx.org/
Quote:
LyX is a document processor that encourages an approach to writing based on the structure of your documents (WYSIWYM) and not simply their appearance (WYSIWYG).
For the support information
\begin{suppinfo}
$^1$H NMR, FTIR, and WAXS characterization of random copolymers and a comparison of the two methods for measuring $\tau_{b}^*$ are given in the Supporting Information.
\end{suppinfo}

Source: http://www.latex-community.org/forum...php?f=4&t=5488

2) cited via the references:
Quote:
Cardenas, Raony. "LaTeX and PLoS ONE - SEQanswers." SEQanswers Home. Seqanswers. Web. 18 Aug. 2011. <http://seqanswers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=13531>.
Just use this tool -> http://www.easybib.com/

3)I have no idea, but from Wikipedia:
Quote:
The original version of TeX used a hyphenation algorithm based on a set of rules for the removal of prefixes and suffixes of words, and for deciding if it should insert a break between the two consonants in a pattern of the form vowel–consonant–consonant–vowel (which is possible most of the time).[21] TeX82 introduced a new hyphenation algorithm, designed by Frank Liang in 1983, to assign priorities to breakpoints in letter groups. A list of hyphenation patterns is first generated automatically from a corpus of hyphenated words (a list of 50,000 words). If TeX must find the acceptable hyphenation positions in the word encyclopedia, for example, it will consider all the subwords of the extended word .encyclopedia., where . is a special marker to indicate the beginning or end of the word. The list of subwords include all the subwords of length 1 (., e, n, c, y, etc.), of length 2 (.e, en, nc, etc.), etc., up to the subword of length 14, which is the word itself, including the markers. TeX will then look into its list of hyphenation patterns, and find subwords for which it has calculated the desirability of hyphenation at each position. In the case of our word, 11 such patterns can be matched, namely 1c4l4, 1cy, 1d4i3a, 4edi, e3dia, 2i1a, ope5d, 2p2ed, 3pedi, pedia4, y1c. For each position in the word, TeX will calculate the maximum value obtained among all matching pattern, yielding en1cy1c4l4o3p4e5d4i3a4. Finally, the acceptable positions are those indicated by an odd number, yielding the acceptable hyphenations en-cy-clo-pe-di-a. This system based on subwords allows the definition of very general patterns (such as 2i1a), with low indicative numbers (either odd or even), which can then be superseded by more specific patterns (such as 1d4i3a) if necessary. These patterns find about 90% of the hyphens in the original dictionary; more importantly, they do not insert any spurious hyphen. In addition, a list of exceptions (words for which the patterns do not predict the correct hyphenation) are included with the Plain TeX format; additional ones can be specified by the user
Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TeX#Hyp..._justification

Hope it helps
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Old 08-18-2011, 05:03 AM   #3
schmima
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Thanks a lot for the answers and the links to the nice tools I'll see what I can do

All the best,

Marc
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